Tips to Enhance Your Easter Photos

April 06, 2012  •  Leave a Comment

Looking to take great images of the kids this Easter? Try a few of the techniques that I used last weekend while photographing the Spina Bifida Association of Kentucky’s Easter Egg Hunt.

SBAK Easter 2012-0043

 

Get Out Front - Be prepared and be a few steps ahead of the kids when they take off for the treasured eggs. Treat those first few moments like you are photographing the start of a race. I recommend using a fast shutter speed. If you are not sure what shutter speed to use, try using the Sports (running man icon) mode to help you capture that first burst of energy as the kids “take off.” And shoot, shoot, shoot! Check your camera to see if it has a continuous shooting mode. Back in the days when I was shooting film, I was told it takes approximately 36 shots to get one good picture.

 

Get Up Close. Fill the Frame - One of the biggest pieces of advice I give to new photographers is to fill the frame. Get in close, by either using a zoom/telephoto lens or by moving closer to the subject. If you are new to photography and always use the Auto setting mode, change it up by using the Portrait mode (the one with the headshot icon) or the Sports mode, if the kids are playing or in motion. Shoot both horizontal and vertical pictures. 

SBAK Easter 2012-0093

 

Position Yourself to be Eye Level with the Child - Photographs are more interesting when you alter your point of view, which may mean squatting, or sitting on the ground so your eyes will meet their eyes.

 

Use Props - Include a stuffed bunny or an Easter basket filled with eggs in the photo. It helps the child to focus on something else and not on the camera. When they focus on the camera, they give you their “fake” or “cheese” smile.

SBAK Easter 2012-0187

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stand Behind Them - Because of my corporate job, sometimes I have  to photograph kids without showing their face in an image. I think that has helped to me to look at situations more creatively. So how can I tell a story without showing a child’s face? The image below perfectly showcases the little dude with his basket of eggs. Always look for different ways to tell your story and snap several images to tell the complete story. Think with the end product in mind. What images do you need to tell your story if you were to scrapbook them? 

SBAK Easter 2012-0121

 

Encourage Play and Spontaneity - Don’t force posed shots. Encourage them to play, so you can capture their natural smile, their energy and their laughter. By encouraging play, you also set up the opportunity to get adorable shots of siblings, cousins and friends playing together. Most of the time when I am shooting portraits, it is the unposed spontaneous shots that parents like most because those are the images that captures their child’s personality.

 

Editor’s Note: I am the past board president of the Spina Bifida Association of Kentucky and I have been photographing events for the nonprofit for more than eight years. The people, especially the children, living with the birth defect, spina bifida, inspire me to face life’s challenges head on. I am in awe of their spirit, tenacity and courage. To learn more about the Spina Bifida Association of Kentucky, go to www.sbak.org.  

SBAK Easter 2012-0147


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